Perspective was an important tool of Victorian artists and architects. Measured perspective in particular allowed architects to accurately portray proposed buildings, and was probably how the Storey Institute was first visualised. In painting, the picture plane, the surface of the canvas, provided a window into another, often more fantastic, reality. This proposal plays with these concepts as the external wall of the gallery becomes the picture plane depicting the internal reality of the gallery, standing for creative space, within. The role of viewer and gallery are reversed.

The use of electroluminescent wire extends a tradition of lit signs and neon images into the twenty-first century. Electroluminescence, first used in car dashboards by Chrysler in the 1960’s , is now available in infinitely long lengths of wire. Easily manipulated, it provides the perfect drawing medium for the nocturnal image. The projected Storey Gallery - part drawing, part advertisement - turns the Storey Institute wall into a billboard.

Supported by Arts Council England and National Lottery Supported by New Environmental Economy (via the Peak District National Park Authority) Supported by New Environmental Economy (via the Peak District National Park Authority)