We usually encounter a lake as a surface whose appearance owes more to the deception of mirror than the transparency of glass. In the English Lake District, mountains reflected on water suggest the lake takes the form and colour of its perfect inverse.

In reality lakes are more murky and mysterious. A more uncertain world lies under these surfaces. Uncleansed by waves or swift currents, the moraines and silts of not only geological history line these lakebeds.

Forty-eight lights float silently on the surface of Coniston Water. During the light of day we see only the reflections of the surround hills. But as night falls, almost imperceptively, we notice the bed of the lake. As night dominates the transference is complete: day and night, water and air are reversed, as the bed of the lake, its fish and plant life come become the focus of attention.

Double Negative was part of the FRED festival of site specific art in Cumbria during October 2007

Supported by Arts Council England and National Lottery Supported by New Environmental Economy (via the Peak District National Park Authority) Supported by New Environmental Economy (via the Peak District National Park Authority)