From April 1999 till March 2000 I watched every moonrise. A demanding year: the moon rises approximately one hour later every day so in each month there is a testing spell of rising every night for a week or more. Daytime required a rescheduling of commitments and the occasional excuse or hasty farewell! I travelled widely and experienced moonrises in Spain, Germany, France, Scotland, Costa Rica, Peru and Egypt besides my native Derbyshire and recorded each moonrise, whether visible or not, with a photograph.

While I originally took on the project for its physical challenge and commitment, the real challenge emerged as the work progressed: sighting the moon. Impossible in winter nights when heavy cloud dominated the skys, and frustrating in the daytime as the moon rose rose against the misty horizon. Consequently, epistemological issues became manifest in the original witnessing of moonrises; scientific prediction can anticipate the event but not the sensation or the fulfilment of seeing the moonrise.

Returning to the original photographs, it was with these thoughts that I selected and composed thirteen images to explore the tensions inherent between predictable cyclical repetition and visual sensation, and its attendant problems of recognition and uncertainty.

Supported by Arts Council England and National Lottery Supported by New Environmental Economy (via the Peak District National Park Authority) Supported by New Environmental Economy (via the Peak District National Park Authority)